Tables and Figures

FIGURES, LEGENDS, TABLES

Common Mistakes in Writing the Results Section

Wordvice HJ

Common Mistakes in Writing the Results Section

DATA PRESENTATION

Graphs, Tables, and Figures in Scientific Publications: The Good, the Bad, and How Not to Be

the Latter

Lauren E. Franzblau, Kevin C. Chung

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22305731/

General tips

Legend Aspect Tip
Overall Keep the average length around 100-300 words. Use complete sentences to aid comprehension, but phrases are permissible. Use the same abbreviations, terminology, and units as in the body of your article, particularly in Methods and Results. Always double-check your journal’s Guide for Authors for specific instructions about figures and captions.
Title For each figure, make sure the title can adequately describe all of the panels of that figure. If it’s not possible to create a single title that fits all, reconsider how you group the images. Use descriptive language to highlight the methods or type of analysis performed (e.g., “Structural comparison of peptide-activated XY receptors”). Use declarative language to emphasize a conclusion or major finding (e.g., “Compound ABC accelerates insulin production”). Use the active voice with strong verbs.
Materials and Methods Keep it brief. Only include information that is necessary to interpret the figure. The description might include details like the treatments and conditions applied or the models used. It should contain enough detail so the reader does not have to search the methods section for additional information. Confirm whether the journal wants you to include or exclude from legends, the details regarding the methods and materials used. Use past tense for verbs when discussing completed experiments.
Results Summarize the conclusion in one sentence. If you use a declarative title, consider whether you should restate the results in the body of the legend. Include sample size, p-values, and the number of replicates, if applicable. Use past tense for verbs.
Definitions In the figure (not the legend), define any symbols, abbreviations, colors, lines, scales, error bars, etc. Also, label any other aspect of your figure that might not be readily understood. Avoid naming conventions that are only used by your organization. Instead, use intuitive or standard names that outsiders can understand.

Common Mistakes in Writing the Results Section

Wordvice HJ

Common Mistakes in Writing the Results Section

DOS AND DONTS

Design your figure to clarify your point

Arrange your figure logically

Arrange your figure to facilitate interpretation

Dos and Don’ts for Authors and Reviewers

Reprinted from the AAI Newsletter, November 2009–May 2010

https://www.aai.org/AAISite/media/Publications/AAI_Dos_Donts.pdf

PRACTICES

Bad

Good

Bad                                                                                                             Good

Graphs, Tables, and Figures in Scientific Publications: The Good, the Bad, and How Not to Be

the Latter

Lauren E. Franzblau, Kevin C. Chung

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22305731/